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    Your 6-Month-Old's Complete Food Chart & Nutritional Guide
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    6 month old baby feeding schedule
    04 July 2017

    Your 6-Month-Old's Complete Food Chart & Nutritional Guide

    24 mins read
    Food & Nutrition
    for Baby
    45.0K engaged
    Would you believe it – your little baby is already six months old! It seems just the other day when you brought her home from the hospital, all fragile and delicate, and now look at her! Your unconditional love, care and attention have helped her grow into an energetic, healthy and happy little human being.

    Up to six months of age, doctors recommend exclusive breastfeeding (or formula feeding) for infants. All this while, your nutritious, antibody-rich breastmilk has not just helped your baby grow but also develop immunity and gain weight. Now, at six months, there is a very significant milestone coming up in your baby’s development: introduction to solid food! This is the time when many mothers introduce solid foods to their babies.

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    Your Baby’s Complete Food & Nutrition Guide - Month 6
    What Your 6 Month Baby Is Up To

    A six-months-old baby is very curious about the world around her, observing tiny details and trying to grasp things with her little fist. Some little ones might even start crawling and being much more mobile at this time! While some babies start sitting up alone now, others attempt to prop themselves up on their hands. Your baby is smiling and babbling a lot too as she spends time with her loved ones.

    Developmental Guide for 6-Months-Old Baby


    This is only a sneak peek into what your 6 month baby is up to! You can refer to our complete development guide for a six-month-old baby here to read more about your munchkin’s activities and development milestones.



    All this is clearly quite a lot to do for a tiny baby! Your munchkin’s food and nutrition requirements are of paramount importance now, to match with all the rapid growth and development she’s doing. While your breastmilk (or formula milk) will still continue to form a major part of her diet, she is going to get her first taste of solid and semi-solid foods too. Find out all about 6 month old baby feeding schedule with our expert food & nutrition guide.

    Feeding Your 6-Month Baby

    Your baby will now start showing signs of readiness for solid foods. Watch out for your little one trying to pick up food with her thumb or forefinger, and keenly observing ‘adult’ food on the dinner table!

    Let’s find out more about 6 month old baby food chart and what all to keep in mind during this transition.

    When To Feed Your 6-Month Baby
    • It is a good idea to slowly introduce your baby to solids foods at this half-year mark. Is it advisable to introduce solids before 6 months? No, experts do not recommend doing this earlier. Your baby’s digestive system and immunity are not properly developed before 6 months.
    • The daytime is the recommended time-slot for introducing new foods at 6 months. This is to ensure that your baby can easily digest the food through the day and you can be on guard for any adverse reactions or allergies.
    • Avoid introducing new foods during travelling, when your baby is unwell or cranky, or for dinner-time.
    What Can 6 Month Old Babies Eat?
    • The first solids that you feed your baby should preferably be home-cooked, soft, pureed/mashed and easily digestible. Feeding your baby home-cooked food is recommended so you can be completely sure of the freshness, composition and suitability for your baby. You can also rest assured that your baby is not exposed to any preservatives or artificial flavours present in store-bought foods. However, there are some doctor-approved baby purees now available in the market. Please discuss with your paediatrician in case you decide to opt for the same.
    • Mashed fruit purees such as banana puree or chikoo puree, porridge, and daal khichdi are some good options for solid food for 6 month old. Refer to this list of comprehensive paediatrician-approved first solid foods for more ideas.
    • Breastmilk (or formula milk) will still be a major part of your baby’s daily diet. Solid food is mainly a supplement at this age, so you should continue feeding your baby adequate breastmilk or formula. To guarantee that your baby is getting a good balance of milk and solid food, track your baby’s growth (height and weight) carefully and never miss on a periodic health check-up. Also ensure she is wetting diapers at regular intervals (typically 4-5 times a day) and having periodic bowel movements (1-2 times a day). You can read more about balancing milk and solid food for babies here.
    • Avoid adding any sugar, salt or honey to your baby’s food. When feeding fruit purees or mash, the natural sweetness of fruits is sufficient for first baby foods. Be especially cautious about honey – it can be very dangerous to feed this to babies under 1 year as the baby’s immature digestive system cannot yet handle the spores present in honey. It can trigger a condition called infant botulism that induces muscle weakness and breathing problems. Honey is safe for babies above 1 year.
    • It is also recommended to avoid sugary foods, caffeinated drinks and sticky foods for babies, at least till 1 year of age. Such foods can affect your baby’s health, mood and even sleeping patterns. You can refer here to an exhaustive list of hazardous foods not suitable for young babies.
    How to Feed Your 6-Month Baby
    3 Days Wait Rule
    • Always follow the “3 days-wait-rule” when introducing solids to baby. This rule states that you must maintain a gap of three days between any two new foods (see table below). This lets your baby’s tummy adjust to the new food and also lets you test for any food allergies.
    • Once a food item has passed the 3-day test, you can proceed to introducing another new food. Now, during the next 3 days of waiting for the second new food, your baby can also enjoy the previously tested food. For example – if banana puree has passed the test and you have now introduced apple puree, your baby can consume both the purees during the next few days.
    • You can maintain a baby food journal where you keep notes of the food items introduced to your baby with dates and any side effects.
    Table: 3-Days-Wait Rule for Weaning Food
    Day Quantity Time
    Day 1 1tbsp Breakfast
    Day 2 2tbsp Breakfast and/or Lunch.
    Day 3 3tbsp Breakfast and/or Lunch
    Important Weaning Guidelines for Your Baby

    In order to introduce your baby to solid foods, you will have to gradually wean her off breastmilk (or formula milk). This does not mean you will stop breastfeeding at this point; it only means reduced frequency and gradual exposure to a wider range of solid and semi-solid foods.

    • Consider using the baby-led-weaning approach to help your baby to decide what, when and how much to eat. This is a good way to teach your baby a sense of control and empowerment early on.
    • Always ensure the food you offer to your baby is freshly cooked, soft, and doesn’t have any big lumps or chunks.
    • Feed your baby when she is in a sitting up position. Never feed her when she is lying down as it can be a choking hazard.
    • Be prepared for challenges during weaning from breastfeeding. Many babies take time to adapt to the new feeding routine, and might spit up or be disinterested in solid food for the first few days/weeks. Their tastes may also change drastically from day to day. Have patience and experiment with the menu (refer to the weekly meal planners below).
    • Some mothers find it beneficial to breastfeed after the solid diet. This helps the baby to understand that if she has some solids first, then mommy will breastfeed.
    • If you continue to have trouble with weaning even after trying for a couple of weeks, it is possible that your baby may not be ready yet. She may also be feeling unwell or be distracted by something more interesting than food! You can read here in detail about the reasons your baby might be rejecting solid food.
    How Much to Feed Your 6-Month Baby
    • Experts state that a 6-month-old needs solid foods only in very small quantities. The amount of solid food should be increased slowly as she gets accustomed to different types of food. When introducing a new food item to your 6 month baby, start out with a 1tbsp. You can increase the quantity to 2-3 tbsp over the next few days. Use this guide to read in more detail about the right serving sizes for babies.
    • Keep track of the signs to find if your baby is hungry or full. If your baby is turning his head away or getting cranky, use this as a cue to stop feeding. It is not advised to force-feed your baby. Feeding her more will not help her sleep better either; this is only a misconception.
    • Do not force feed your baby because she doesn’t seem to have eaten enough solid food. Her intake will be low when she is just starting solids, but will gradually increase as she adapts to the new tastes and textures. Force-feeding has been identified as a potential trigger for fussy eating habits later in life. It could also increase the baby’s risk of childhood obesity.

     


    Did You Know: Research suggests that your baby’s formative years determine her relationship with food for life! This means, if she develops healthy eating habits now on, she is likely to always be a healthy eater. Now, that’s even more reason not to force feed our little ones but encourage them to decide the quantity on their own and take control over what’s on their plate!

    Watch the video below for expert tips on what to do when your child just won't eat. (Surprise - one of them is to check your child's juice and milk consumption!)



    Recommended Dietary Allowances for 6 Month Babies

    To decide how much solid food is recommended for a 6 month old, parents must keep in mind the nutritional needs of the baby at this age. The Indian Council of Medical Research has shared guidelines on the recommended dietary allowances (RDA) for 6-month-old babies. Use this guide to understand the amount of essential nutrients and energy your baby needs now.

    Nutrient Amount Needed
    Net Energy Requirement 80 kcal/kg/day*
    Protein 1.69g/kg/day*
    Fat 19g of visible (added) fat
    Calcium 500mg
    Iron 5mg
    * The RDA is calculated on the basis of your baby’s weight. Example –
    • If your child weighs 6kg at 6 months, his calorie requirement will be 480kcal per day
    • If child weighs 6kg at 6 months, his protein requirement will be 10.14g per day
    Note: Iron – A Nutrient of Concern in 6 Month Old Babies

    Babies need a balanced diet for optimum growth and development – a diet that’s rich in all essential nutrients mentioned in the RDA above. Many of these needs are fulfilled at this time by breastmilk or formula milk. However, there is one nutrient of particular concern that we need to supplement through diet: Iron


    Full-term babies are born with iron stores that get accumulated during the last few months in the womb. These stores can last up to six months. However, these iron stores of babies start getting depleted after 6 months. They must be supplemented through diet. If this is not done, it may lead to iron deficiency anaemia, delayed cognition, and developmental delays. Consider including iron-rich foods for babies in the menu, such as iron-fortified cereal, sweet potato and soyabean.

    Precautions & General Tips for Feeding a 6 Month Old Baby
    • Be careful for the warning signs of a food allergy which include running nose, rashes, tummy pain, vomiting and crankiness. If you suspect your baby is displaying these signs as a reaction to any food, please stop feeding immediately and consult the paediatrician.
    • Ensure to properly mash/puree the food before serving to your baby. Don’t feed any chunky food that could get stuck in the baby’s throat. Also, don’t feed her when she is lying down. It is very important to be careful about choking hazards when starting solid foods for babies.
    • You can add some breastmilk (or formula milk) to the baby’s food to improve its taste and texture for the baby. Do this only after the food is prepared, and not during cooking. Kheers or porridges can also be made with formula or breast milk.
    • Note the baby food safety warnings by paediatricians to ensure your little one’s food is not contaminated, of the right temperature, and not a potential allergen. Also be careful while buying fruits and vegetables for your baby and be doubly cautious of cleaning them before cooking.
    6 Month Old Baby Food Chart - Week-By-Week

    It is now time to plan your baby’s weekly menu for the month! It is recommended to break your baby’s daily diet into 6 meal times –breakfast, mid-morning snack, lunch, evening snack, dinner and late night. In this first month of weaning, your baby’s post-lunch ‘meals’ are still likely to be breastmilk (or formula milk).

    Week 1

    In the first week of introducing solids to your baby, you must be extremely cautious about the 3-day rule. It is best to stick to only 2-3 new foods in this week, in a very small quantity, and preferably for breakfast. This will help you watch out for any reactions or signs of allergies to the new foods.

     

    Fresh fruit and vegetable purees are a good candidate for a 6 month baby food schedule. They are soft, easily digested, and babies enjoy the taste too. Breastmilk (or formula milk) will continue to be the main diet at this time.

    Sample Food Chart
    6-month old Baby Week 1
    MONTH 6 – WEEK 1 Breakfast
    (09:00 AM)
    Mid-Morning Snack
    (11:00 AM)
    Lunch
    (01:00 PM)
    Evening Snack
    (05:00 PM)
    Dinner
    (08:00 PM)
    Late Night
    (10:00 PM)
    DAY 1 1tsp* Banana Puree Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    DAY 2 1tbsp^ Banana Puree Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    DAY 3 2-3tbsp Banana Puree Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    DAY 4 1tsp Boiled Pumpkin Puree Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    DAY 5 1tbsp Boiled Pumpkin Puree Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    DAY 6 2-3tbsp Boiled Pumpkin Puree Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    DAY 7 1tsp Carrot Puree Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    Week 2

    It is now time to introduce your little one to some more new foods. Apart from a new fruit puree and/or milkshake, you should also introduce cereal and grains at this time. This is important for your growing baby’s needs. Don’t forget the three-day rule and make the introduction to a new food item gradually. Avoid feeding a new food for the first time at dinner.

    Sample Food Chart
    6-month old Baby Week 2
    MONTH 6 – WEEK 2 Breakfast
    (09:00 AM)
    Mid-Morning Snack
    (11:00 AM)
    Lunch
    (01:00 PM)
    Evening Snack
    (05:00 PM)
    Dinner
    (08:00 PM)
    Late Night
    (10:00 PM)
    DAY 1 2tbsp Carrot Puree Breastmilk/Formula 3tbsp Banana puree in milk Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    DAY 2 2-3tbsp Carrot Puree Breastmilk/Formula 1tsp mashed Rice Cereal in Milk Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    DAY 3 1-2tbsp of mashed Rice Cereal in Milk Breastmilk/Formula 3tbsp Carrot-Pumpkin Puree Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    DAY 4 1tsp Pear Puree Breastmilk/Formula 2-3tbsp of mashed Rice Cereal in Milk Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    DAY 5 1-2tbsp Pear Puree Breastmilk/Formula 2-3tbsp of Carrot Rice Blend Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula Breastmilk/Formula
    DAY 6 3tbsp Pear Puree BM/Formula 1tsp Suji Kheer BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 7 1tbsp Suji Kheer with mashed Banana BM/Formula 2-3tbsp of Pumpkin Rice Blend BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    Week 3

    Let this be a soupy week! Experts recommend introducing your baby to soup at this time, starting with nutritious but light soups such as daal (pulses) or pumpkin. You can also serve freshly pressed fruit juice to your baby in a small quantity. Make sure you strictly stay away from packaged or sweetened fruit juices and canned soup.

    Sample Food Chart
    6-month old Baby Week 3
    MONTH 6 – WEEK 3 Breakfast
    (09:00 AM)
    Mid-Morning Snack
    (11:00 AM)
    Lunch
    (01:00 PM)
    Evening Snack
    (05:00 PM)
    Dinner
    (08:00 PM)
    Late Night
    (10:00 PM)
    DAY 1 1tsp Chikoo Puree BM/Formula 1-2tbsp Suji Upma with Carrots BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 2 3tbsp Suji Kheer BM/Formula 2tbsp Chikoo Milkshake BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 3 2-3tbsp Chikoo Puree BM/Formula 2-3tbsp of Rice Kheer BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 4 1tbsp Thick Moong Dal BM/Formula 3tbsp Rice Carrot Blend BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 5 2-3tbsp Suji Kheer with Banana Puree BM/Formula 1-2tbsp Rice-Moong Dal Khichdi BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 6 3tbsp Banana Milkshake BM/Formula 1-2tbsp Spinach Khichdi BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 7 1tsp Carrot-Pumpkin Puree BM/Formula 2-3tbsp Spinach Khichdi BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    Week 4

    The month is about to end and your baby has been introduced to several solid foods! Continue to feed mashed or pureed food to your baby, slowly increasing the quantity. It is likely that your baby will now also start relishing foods such as porridge and khichdi. Just remember not to force-feed your baby at any time. If your baby is still hungry but is unwilling to eat solids on a certain day, you can compensate by feeding more breastmilk (or formula milk).

    Sample Food Chart
    6-month old Baby Week 4
    MONTH 6 – WEEK 4 Breakfast
    (09:00 AM)
    Mid-Morning Snack
    (11:00 AM)
    Lunch
    (01:00 PM)
    Evening Snack
    (05:00 PM)
    Dinner
    (08:00 PM)
    Late Night
    (10:00 PM)
    DAY 1 1tsp Malted Ragi Porridge BM/Formula 2tbsp Pumpkin Khichdi BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 2 1-2tbsp Ragi Kheer BM/Formula 2-3tbsp thin Suji Upma with Carrots BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 3 2-3tbsp Rice Porridge with Pumpkin BM/Formula 2tbsp Ragi Kheer BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 4 1tsp boiled mashed Potato + 1 tbsp Pear Puree BM/Formula 1tbsp Fruity Oats Ragi Porridge BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 5 1-2tbsp Baked Potato Mash BM/Formula 2tbsp Oats Porridge with Chikoo BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 6 1tsp Fruity Oats Ragi Porridge BM/Formula 2-3tbsp Pumpkin Soup with mashed rice BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    DAY 7 1tsp Peach Puree + boiled mashed Potato BM/Formula 2-3tbsp mashed Pumpkin, Carrot Khichdi BM/Formula BM/Formula BM/Formula
    FAQs

    1. Is my baby ready to eat solids?

    Yes. At six months of age, your baby is ready to slowly get introduced to solid foods. Her digestive system is now more mature, and she is also growing up fast. Experts recommend that 6 months is a good time to start making this transition. Delaying it beyond 9 months could lead to problems such as oral aversion wherein the baby shows partial or full food refusal, in spite of being old enough to eat solid food.

     

    You can read about this in detail here: When To Feed Your 6-Month Baby.

    2. What are the best solids to start with?

    To start with, doctors recommend that the first solids preferably be home-cooked, soft, pureed/mashed and easily digestible. You can start with mashed fruit purees such as banana puree or chikoo puree, porridge, and daal khichdi. While home-cooked, fresh food is the best option, you can also opt for doctor-approved baby purees available in the market. Please discuss this with your paediatrician.

     

    You can read about this in detail here: What Can 6 Month Old Babies Eat?

    3. How do I begin to give my baby solids?

    To begin to give solids to your baby, start following the “3 days-wait-rule”. You can pick one of the doctor-recommended solid foods, such as a banana puree, and feed it to your baby. She needs only very small quantities now, so start out with a 1tbsp and increase the quantity to 2-3 tbsp over the next few days. Maintain a gap of three days between any two new foods to let your baby’s tummy adjust and also be warned of any food allergies or side effects to the introduced food. Breastmilk (or formula milk) will still form the major part of your baby’s diet. It is recommended to follow a baby-led-weaning approach to help your baby decide what, when and how much to eat.

     

    You can read about this in detail here: How to Feed Your 6-Month Baby.

    4. Is there a specific time of the day to start feeding my baby solids?

    Yes, the daytime (breakfast or lunch time) is the recommended time-slot for introducing new foods to your baby at 6 months. This helps ensure that your baby can easily digest the food through the day. This also makes it easier for you to spot any adverse reactions or food allergies in your baby.

     

    You can refer to our 6 Month Old Baby Food Chart - Week-By-Week to get a detailed daily breakdown of your 6-month-old’s menu.

    5. What are the foods I should avoid?

    When your baby is 6 months old, it is best to feed him fresh, home-made food that’s devoid of any artificial additives or colouring. Avoid any foods that are hard to digest or heavy on the stomach such as biscuits or cow’s milk. Also avoid adding any sugar, salt or honey to your baby’s food. Honey can be especially dangerous for babies under 1 year as their immature digestive system cannot yet handle the spores in honey. This can trigger a condition called infant botulism that induces muscle weakness and breathing problems.

     

    You can read about this in detail here: What Can 6 Month Old Babies Eat?

    6. Is 6-months a good time for my baby to start using a sippy cup?

    Yes, you can start teaching your baby how to drink from a cup when she gets 6 months old. It will also benefit you in weaning her from breastmilk to other fluids like water, and eventually, cow’s milk (at age 1 year). Experts recommend going for a sippy cup that has a spout and two handles so it’s easier for your baby to hold on.

    7. When can I start introducing Indian spices like cumin, coriander, turmeric, etc.? Also, when can I begin to add in stronger tastes like pepper and cinnamon?

    Expert opinion on this varies; while some doctors recommend waiting until 8 months to introduce spices, some permit spices in baby food starting 6 months of age. It is generally considered safe to add a nominal amount of light spices like cumin and turmeric in your baby’s food as early as 6 months. You can also add garlic (lehsun), ginger (adrak), asafoetida (hing), fennel seeds (saunf), mustard (sarson), fenugreek (methi), and coriander (dhania).

     

    However, consider delaying the introduction of spices like chillies and pepper till 8 months. While adding spices in your baby’s diet, introduce one spice at a time in very small amounts (a pinch). Always wait for 3-4 days before introducing another spice. This will let you check for any adverse reactions.

     

    Also Read: Flavours To First Foods – a Mom’s Perspective on Adding Spices to Baby Food

    8. How much yogurt can my 6-month old baby have?

    Babies can start eating yogurt when they reach the age of 6 months. It is good for the stomach and also provides vitamins, protein and calcium. Stick to a teaspoon of yogurt when you first introduce it, and you can gradually move to 2-3 tablespoons once your baby has adjusted to this new food. Avoid adding sugar to the yogurt and opt for an unsweetened form as far as possible. Added sugar in food is not healthy for a baby’s stomach and overall health.

    9. I seem to spend all day cooking for my baby who spits everything up. The only thing she ever eats in store-bought baby food. Is it okay for me to resort to this after I pull my hair out trying everything else?

    Don’t worry, moms. It is totally normal for babies this age to spit up food because their digestive system is still immature and their oesophageal sphincter (the muscle that holds back food in the stomach) doesn't close tightly. This is what triggers spitting back up of their last meal. However, this will soon get better as most babies outgrow spitting between 6 months and 1 year of age.

     

    If your baby shows interest only in store-bought foods, it could be because of their colour and packaging. Some store-bought foods also have added sugar and flavourings, which make the food tastier but are not recommended for babies. To get your baby interested in home-made food, try making colourful and interesting baby foods like peach puree or atta porridge with banana. You can also consider lightly flavouring the food with Indian spices, such as in these baby khichdi recipes.

     

    You can read about this in detail here: What Can 6 Month Old Babies Eat?

    10. Can I use tinned fruits (in natural juice) and tinned veggies for my 6-month old baby?

    When buying fruits and veggies for your baby, fresh produce is always the best option. Try and purchase fresh fruits and veggies for your baby as far as possible. However, some canned fruits and veggies can also be safe, as long as you select a medically approved version for babies, and check the list of ingredients thoroughly.

    The can must not contain added sugar, salt, or any sauces. Also double check the shelf life and expiry date of the can before purchasing. That said, fresh food remains the best option for babies, as canned foods may exhibit some loss of nutrient value due to their packaging.

    11. Are vegetable or chicken stock cubes okay to use while making food for my baby as I do not have the time to make actual stock?

    Vegetable or chicken stock cubes often contain a large amount of salt. Excess salt is not good for the baby’s stomach as their digestive system is unable to process it. It is thus best to refrain from using store-bought stock cubes as far as possible. If you do have to use them, look for low-salt versions and get them approved by your paediatrician.

    12. When I feed my formula-fed baby cereal, am I supposed to use boiled cow’s milk like adults do or use formula in the cereal as well?

    Doctors do not recommend cow’s milk for babies till they are 1 year old. This is because the composition of cow’s milk is very different from breast milk or formula, and the baby’s digestive system cannot digest this properly yet. Thus, till your baby turns 1 year old, it is best to stick to breast milk or formula milk for mixing with cereal as well.

    13. Can I do anything to prevent my baby from turning into a fussy eater?

    At this age, the best thing to develop healthy eating habits in your child is to follow a baby-led weaning approach. Under this approach, you need to let your baby decide how much to eat and never force-feed her. Force-feeding has been seen to trigger fussy eating habits later in life, as the little one is unable to develop portion control, or the habit of eating as per the body’s needs.

     

    Also opt to feed your baby fresh, home-made foods to help her appreciate the taste of wholesome foods early in life. Strictly keep her away from sugary, salty foods, as such foods have been noted to fuel unhealthy and picky eating habits in the future.

     

    You can read about this in detail here: How Much to Feed Your 6-Month Baby.

     

    Conclusion

    The above 6 month old baby feeding chart will help your little one make the transition from breastmilk (or formula milk) to the world of solid foods. Please remember that every baby is different, and may adapt to these new eating habits at a different pace. It is advised to use this guide as a reference for feeding your baby and planning her meals.

     

    Please consult the paediatrician to get specific advice on your baby’s meals if she shows reluctance to solids by the end of 6 months, or displays any signs of allergy.

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    Comments (7)

    profile pic
    Hi moms plz my Daughter is 6 months+,plz need help on the food dat will help my baby to gain weight,am new here thanks
    profile pic
    Sruthi Shankar
    Very informative... Can you also suggest few food recipes for 9 months old
    profile pic
    Ujwala Bodke
    It's like single googling for all queries and 100% satisfaction
    profile pic
    Ujwala Bodke
    Thank u world of moms
    profile pic
    Sam D
    Really Informative and helpful :)
    profile pic
    Deboshree Bhattacharjee
    Love this, very useful for moms!
    profile pic
    Tilottama Chatterjee
    Very useful!

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